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FOR US CONSUMERS

  • BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is a prescription medication used long-term to treat adults with COPD READ MORE...(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), including chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. SHOW LESS
  • BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is not a rescue inhaler and is not for use to treat sudden COPD symptoms. READ MORE...It is not for use in asthma. SHOW LESS

TALKING TO YOUR DOCTOR

Speaking up about your COPD symptoms—it helps to be open.

Maintaining an open conversation with your doctor about your COPD may help manage your condition. But sometimes it’s hard to remember what you want to talk about or ask when you’re sitting in your doctor’s office.

This COPD Doctor Discussion Guide can help you remember, record, and report what you need to talk about with your doctor. Take a few minutes to answer the 4 questions below.

Once you answer the questions, you’ll get a quick COPD guide with personalized tips, a handy list of useful medical terms, plus questions you may want to ask your doctor.

Start guide below

registration form

Q1

Over the past week, have you noticed that any of the following symptoms improved, worsened, or stayed the same?

 
  Improved
  Worsened
  Stayed the same
 
  Improved
  Worsened
  Stayed the same
 
  Improved
  Worsened
  Stayed the same
Q2

During the past week, how many times have you tended to use your rescue inhaler?

  Never
  Occasionally
  Daily or more
Q3

Have you noticed any of your daily routine activities being affected by your breathing? Select all that apply.

 Bathing
 Dressing/Undressing
 Preparing Meals
 Groceries
 Laundry
 None
Q4

Have you noticed any leisure activities being impacted by your breathing? Select all that apply.

 Family Gatherings
 Visiting Friends
 Travel
 Dining Out
 Hobbies
 None

YOUR DOCTOR DISCUSSION GUIDE

Now you’re ready to have a conversation with your doctor!

Below, you’ll find a summary of your results to take to your next appointment. You can either:

Download your guide to print later and/or show your doctor.

E-mail your guide to have on record and/or print later.

Below, you’ll find a summary of your results. You can either:

Download your guide to print later and/or show your doctor.

E-mail your guide to have on record and/or print later.

HERE ARE THE QUESTIONS YOU ANSWERED—AND SOME ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR

Below is a quick report based on your answers, plus some tips you can use to help manage your breathing.

TO DISCUSS WITH YOUR DOCTOR

Q1

My symptoms over the past week:

Cough:

Shortness of Breath:

Wheezing:

Q2

My rescue inhaler use over the past week:

Q3

My daily routine activities impacted by breathing:

Q4

My leisure activities impacted by breathing:

Some questions for your doctor

  • Why do I need to have a “controller” inhaler and a “rescue” inhaler? (See Some Medical Terms to Know)

  • Is there anything that will help me breathe better and get more air in?

  • Is there anything that can help me take a deeper breath?

  • What should I do if I feel my COPD/shortness of breath worsening?

  • Do I still need to take my maintenance (controller) medication even if I feel fine?

  • Can I exercise even if I find it hard to breathe?

  • Should I get a flu shot?

  • What else can I do to improve my lung health?

HERE ARE SOME TIPS TO HELP YOU MANAGE YOUR BREATHING

Tips for Your Symptoms

cough

Cough

Avoid bad "air" days. Air pollution can irritate the lungs and make symptoms like cough worse. So try to avoid outdoor irritants like pollen and smog, and indoor ones like paint and cleaning products.

Breath

Shortness of Breath

Aim for regular exercise. You don't need to run a marathon to reap the benefits of exercise. Moderate exercise, like walking, can help improve shortness of breath. Make sure you talk to your doctor about what type of exercise is right for you.

Mucus

Wheezing

Avoid cold and flu germs. Infections can make symptoms worse, so stay away from sick people, and wash your hands to prevent the spread of infection.

Tips for Your Daily Routine Activities

bathing

Bathing

Have a seat while showering. Try using a bath stool instead of standing, and use a robe instead of a towel—it takes less effort to dry off.

Dressing/Undressing

Dressing/Undressing

Get comfortable to get dressed. Sit down while you get dressed or undressed. And use a long-handled reacher to put on shoes and socks to avoid straining.

meals

Preparing Meals

Spend less time over a hot stove. Look for quick recipes that require minimal preparation time, such as frozen dinners and ready mixes.

Groceries

Groceries

Get social while shopping. Bring along a shopping buddy to help you grab items that are too heavy or out of reach, and load/unload groceries.

Laundry

Laundry

Lighten your laundry load. Use a rolling cart to carry your clothes. Then sit down to fold them.

Other

None

Put things within easy reach. When tidying up, think about arranging your house so that the things you use most often are at waist level and easy to reach.

Tips for Your Leisure and Social Activities

Family Gatherings

Family Gatherings

Beat the crowd. Large gatherings can be tiring. So show up early before everyone gets there, grab a comfy seat, then leave early before you feel worn out.

Visiting Friends

Visiting Friends

Grab a virtual coffee together. Don’t cancel if you don’t feel up to going out. Use FaceTime, Skype, or Google Hangouts to stay in touch with friends.

Travel

Travel

Get some wheels—on your luggage. So you can roll it along without having to lift its weight.

Dining Out

Dining Out

Try takeout or order in. You can still have a nice meal without cooking, and still get to hang out with friends or family.

Hobbies

Hobbies

Save your energy before going out. Move slowly and pace yourself as you go about your day, sit during tasks as much as possible, and take rest breaks.

Other

None

Don’t overcommit yourself. Make sure to break up your plans throughout the week so you don’t tire yourself out. That means not setting a movie date the same day you have choir practice and a doctor’s appointment.

SOME MEDICAL TERMS TO KNOW

Here are some medical terms that you may hear when talking with your doctor, so it’s useful to know what they mean. Always ask your doctor to explain any words that you don’t understand.

Bronchodilators: This type of medicine relaxes the muscles around your airways to help them open up and make it easier to breathe.

Controller medication: This is a type of medication (also called "maintenance" medication) that is taken daily to help control or prevent COPD symptoms.

Dyspnea: Shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing.

Hypoxia: Not having enough oxygen in the body.

Maintenance medication: See “Controller medication”

Pulse Oximetry: This is a test that measures the amount of oxygen in your blood. Test results will help your doctor figure out if someone with COPD needs oxygen therapy.

Rescue medication: Also called quick-relief medication, rescue medications are taken as needed for quick, short-term relief of symptoms to help you breathe better.

Spirometry: This is one test that doctors use to help diagnose lung diseases such as COPD. It assesses how well your lungs work by measuring the amount of air that you can exhale, and how quickly you can exhale, after taking a deep breath.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT BEVESPI AEROSPHERE INCLUDING BOXED WARNING

People with asthma who take long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist (LABA) medicines, such as formoterol fumarate (one of the medicines in BEVESPI AEROSPHERE), have an increased risk of death from asthma problems. It is not known if LABA medicines increase the risk of death in people with COPD. BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is only approved for use in COPD. BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is not approved for use in asthma.

  • Call your healthcare provider if breathing problems worsen over time while using BEVESPI AEROSPHERE
  • Get emergency medical care if your breathing problems worsen quickly or if you use your rescue inhaler, but it does not relieve your breathing problems
  • Do not use BEVESPI AEROSPHERE to treat sudden symptoms of COPD. Always have a rescue inhaler with you to treat sudden symptoms
  • BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is not for the treatment of asthma. It is not known if BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is safe and effective in people with asthma
  • Do not use BEVESPI AEROSPHERE if you are allergic to glycopyrrolate, formoterol fumarate, or to any of the ingredients in BEVESPI AEROSPHERE
  • Do not use BEVESPI AEROSPHERE more often than prescribed
  • Do not take BEVESPI AEROSPHERE with other medicines that contain a LABA or an anticholinergic for any reason. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take
  • Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions including heart problems, high blood pressure, seizures, thyroid problems, diabetes, liver problems, glaucoma, prostate or bladder problems, or problems passing urine

BEVESPI AEROSPHERE can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Sudden breathing problems immediately after inhaling your medicine
  • Serious allergic reactions. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency medical care if you get any of the following symptoms of a serious allergic reaction: rash; hives; swelling of the face, mouth and tongue; breathing problems
  • Fast or irregular heartbeat, increased blood pressure, chest pain
  • Tremor or nervousness
  • New or worsened eye problems, including acute narrow-angle glaucoma. Symptoms may include: eye pain or discomfort, nausea or vomiting, blurred vision, seeing halos or bright colors around lights, and red eyes. If you have these symptoms, call your healthcare provider right away before taking another dose
  • New or worsened urinary retention. Symptoms may include difficulty urinating, painful urination, urinating frequently, or urinating in a weak stream or drips. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking BEVESPI AEROSPHERE and call your healthcare provider right away
  • High blood sugar or low blood potassium

Common side effects of BEVESPI AEROSPHERE include urinary tract infection and cough. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

APPROVED USE

BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is a prescription medicine used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is used long term as 2 inhalations, 2 times each day in the morning and in the evening, to improve symptoms of COPD for better breathing. Do not use BEVESPI AEROSPHERE to treat sudden symptoms of COPD; it won't replace a rescue inhaler. BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is not for the treatment of asthma.

Please read full Prescribing Information , including Boxed WARNING, and Medication Guide and Instructions for Use for BEVESPI AEROSPHERE.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT BEVESPI AEROSPHERE INCLUDING BOXED WARNING

People with asthma who take long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist (LABA) medicines, such as formoterol fumarate (one of the medicines in BEVESPI AEROSPHERE), have an increased risk of death from asthma problems. It is not known if LABA medicines increase the risk of death in people with COPD.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.1-800-FDA-1088.

USA flagThis site is intended for US Consumers only.

The information on this Web site should not take the place of talking with your doctor or health care professional. If you have any questions about your condition, or if you would like more information about BEVESPI AEROSPHERE or COPD, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Only you and your doctor can decide if BEVESPI AEROSPHERE is right for you.

Q1
My symptoms over the past week:

Cough:

Shortness of Breath:

Wheezing:

Q2
My rescue inhaler use over the past week:

Q3
My daily routine activities impacted by breathing:

Q4
My leisure activities impacted by breathing:

Bronchodilators: This type of medicine relaxes the muscles around your airways to help them open up and make it easier to breathe.

Controller medication: This is a type of medication (also called "maintenance" medication) that is taken daily to help control or prevent COPD symptoms.

Dyspnea: Shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing.

Hypoxia: Not having enough oxygen in the body.

Maintenance medication: See “Controller medication”

Pulse Oximetry: This is a test that measures the amount of oxygen in your blood. Test results will help your doctor figure out if someone with COPD needs oxygen therapy.

Rescue medication: Also called quick-relief medication, rescue medications are taken as needed for quick, short-term relief of symptoms to help you breathe better.

Spirometry: This is one test that doctors use to help diagnose lung diseases such as COPD. It assesses how well your lungs work by measuring the amount of air that you can inhale and exhale and how quickly you exhale.